Looking towards Cleator Moor

Week In Focus #48

This is #48 of a weekly Photo Challenge that I set myself – there is no particular theme. The idea behind the challenge is to get myself outside into the Cumbrian countryside, at least once a week.

  • This weeks photo looks over the West Cumbria town of Cleator Moor, towards the fells of Ennerdale.
Looking towards Cleator Moor
Looking towards Cleator Moor

Week In Focus #47

This is #47 of a weekly Photo Challenge that I set myself – there is no particular theme. The idea behind the challenge is to get myself outside into the Cumbrian countryside, at least once a week.

  • This weeks photo is of a typical West Cumbrian street – this is Trumpet Terrace, at Cleator.

Trumpet Terrace stretches for at least a quarter of a mile. These were built by eminent mine owner, John Stirling, who was responsible for many other public buildings in the area. The name is borrowed from a field name of adjacent farms.

Trumpet Terrace
Trumpet Terrace

For more images from this shoot, please visit Little Ireland.

Week In Focus #46

This is #46 of a weekly Photo Challenge that I set myself – there is no particular theme. The idea behind the challenge is to get myself outside into the Cumbrian countryside, at least once a week.

  • This week’s photo is of a Victorian Verandah at Cleator Moor in West Cumbria.

The veranda outside of the former Co-op at Cleator Moor is an interesting feature and much loved by the locals. The Victorian Veranda was added to the Co-operative building in 1876. The verandah is glazed, carried on 13 cast-iron fluted Gothic columns with pierced spandrels and antefixe.

The verandah was restored 1984.

The building itself is topped with welsh roof, with stone coping to south end; brick mid and end chimneys. It has 3 storeys, 13 bays. The ground floor has a C20 shop front divided by original fluted and panelled pilasters carrying cornice on which verandah rests. Sashes without glazing bars in stone surrounds to upper floors.

Cleator Moor Victorian Verandah

Whitehaven Golf Course

Week In Focus #44

This is #44 of a weekly Photo Challenge that I set myself – there is no particular theme. The idea behind the challenge is to get myself outside into the Cumbrian countryside, at least once a week.

  • This week’s photo is of Whitehaven Golf Course.

The course was founded in the year 2000. It is a challenging course with many varied holes. Coupled with the spectacular views of Ennerdale and the surrounding fells. The course is 6246 yards, and features 9 ponds and 3 woodland areas.

For more information on playing a round, please visit:

Whitehaven Golf Course
Whitehaven Golf Course
Grass With Blue Sky

Week In Focus #43

This is #43 of a weekly Photo Challenge that I set myself – there is no particular theme. The idea behind the challenge is to get myself outside into the Cumbrian countryside, at least once a week.

  • This week’s photo is of grass.

Weak, slender blades of tender green,
With little fragrance, little sheen,
What maketh ye so dear to all?
Nor bud, nor flower, nor fruit have ye,
So tiny, it can only be
‘Mongst fairies ye are counted tall.

No beauty is in this,— ah, yea,
E’en as I gaze on you to-day,
Your hue and fragrance bear me back
Into the green, wide fields of old,
With clear, blue air, and manifold
Bright buds and flowers in blossoming track.

All bent one way like flickering flame,
Each blade caught sunlight as it came,
Then rising, saddened into shade;
A changeful, wavy, harmless sea,
Whose billows none could bitterly
Reproach with wrecks that they had made.

No gold ever was buried there
More rich, more precious, or more fair
Than buttercups with yellow gloss.
No ships of mighty forest trees
E’er foundered in these guiltless seas
Of grassy waves and tender moss.

Ah, no! ah, no! not guiltless still,
Green waves on meadow and on hill,
Not wholly innocent are ye;
For what dead hopes and loves, what graves,
Lie underneath your placid waves,
While breezes kiss them lovingly!

Calm sleepers with sealed eyes lie there;
They see not, neither feel nor care
If over them the grass be green.
And some sleep here who ne’er knew rest,
Until the grass grew o’er their breast,
And stilled the aching pain within.

Not all the sorrow man hath known,
Not all the evil he hath done,
Have ever cast thereon a stain.
It groweth green and fresh and light,
As in the olden garden bright,
Beneath the feet of Eve and Cain.

It flutters, bows, and bends, and quivers,
And creeps through forests and by rivers,
Each blade with dewy brightness wet,
So soft, so quiet, and so fair,
We almost dream of sleeping there,
Without or sorrow or regret.

Emma Lazarus
Grass With Blue Sky
Grass
Windswept Wheat Field

Week In Focus #42

This is #42 of a weekly Photo Challenge that I set myself – there is no particular theme. The idea behind the challenge is to get myself outside into the Cumbrian countryside, at least once a week.

  • This week’s photo is of a windswept wheat field, in West Cumbria.

Wheat
Hulled, beardless
Eating, gritting, flouring
Such feelings of happiness

Breakfast!

Windswept Wheat Field
Windswept Wheat Field
Moor Row

Week In Focus #41

This is #41 of a weekly Photo Challenge that I set myself – there is no particular theme. The idea behind the challenge is to get myself outside into the Cumbrian countryside, at least once a week.

  • This week’s photo is of a floral display in the village that I live, in West Cumbria.

Moor Row is a residential community situated between Whitehaven and Egremont on Cumbria’s coastal plain. The history of Moor Row goes back to at least 1762, but it was the 19th century discovery of iron ore in the vicinity that built the ‘row of houses on a moor’. Cornish tin miners moved here to work the mines, and their presence is noted in a number of street names such as Penzance Street. One street, Dalzell, is named after Thomas Henry Dalzell, a mine owner.

Moor Row’s Montreal Mines produced 250,000 tons a year, the largest of any mine in the Whitehaven or Furness district. The mine property covered 1,000 acres (4.0 km2), half of which was ore bearing. Both open pit and shaft mining took place. Between 1000 and 1200 people were employed locally in the industry.

In 2014, the village was rated sixth in a list of the best places to bring up children. Places were rated for schools, crime, amenities and affordable homes in a list which looked at family-friendly hotspots.

  • The report analysed all 2,400 postcodes in England and Wales using 71 different factors to determine the best locations for families. Scotland and Northern Ireland aren’t included in the study as they do not collect or report data in the same way.
Moor Row
Moor Row
Longlands Lake

Week In Focus #40

This is #40 of a weekly Photo Challenge that I set myself – there is no particular theme. The idea behind the challenge is to get myself outside into the Cumbrian countryside, at least once a week.

  • This week’s photo is of a former Iron Ore mine in West Cumbria, which is now a lovely little nature reserve. In 1939 the mine started to subside and flood the area, creating Longlands Lake. Longlands was acquired by Cumbria County Council in 1980.

Longlands Lake nestles between Egremont and Cleator Moor and supports an abundance of wildlife within a variety of habitats, which include: broadleaf woodland, unimproved grassland and aquatic vegetation.

The lake is important for its bird population and breeding species include mute swan, coot, moorhen, goosander, tufted duck and mallard.

A circular walk provides safe and enjoyable access all year round for walkers, wheelchair users and those with pushchairs and young children. The surface material is finely crushed local quarry stone which provides a hardwearing, compact surface.

Longlands Lake
Longlands Lake
Crop Of Wild Mushrooms

Week In Focus #39

This is #39 of a weekly Photo Challenge that I set myself – there is no particular theme. The idea behind the challenge is to get myself outside into the Cumbrian countryside, at least once a week.

  • This week’s photo of a crop of wild mushrooms was taken on a local section of Hadrian’s Cycleway, in West Cumbria.

Mushroom Facts:

  1. The Armillaria bulbosa mushroom can grow as big as the Blue Whale
  2. Egyptians considered Mushrooms the plant of immortality.
  3. Mushrooms are known as the meat of the vegetable world.
  4. People who eat wild mushrooms are called Mycophagists.
  5. Over 30 species of Mushroom glow in the dark.
Crop Of Wild Mushrooms
Crop Of Wild Mushrooms